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A Real Philly Cheese Steak

recipe at a glance
Rating: 5/5 5 stars
8 reviews
2 comments

ready in: under 30 minutes
serves/makes:   4
  

recipe id: 7785
cook method: stovetop

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ingredients

1 pound rib eye steak, frozen, then cut very thin
1 onion
mushrooms
Provolone Cheese or Cheese Whiz
4 hoagie rolls

directions

Meat: Make friends with your butcher. You need him to partially freeze a hunk of Rib Eye, and then slice it very thin. You want it sliced thin even though common sense tells us that thick is better. You can buy the hunk of rib eye and freeze and slice it yourself, but the butcher generally does a better job than I do. I can only get it about 1/8" thick and he does less

Bread This is the hard part. If you aren't in the Tristate area, and can't get AMOROSOS rolls (the only thing that is REALLY good on a cheesesteak) then you have to find a substitute. Squishy sub rolls will NOT do. They do not hold together under pressure. Refrain from buying those "hero" rolls too. A good hoagie roll is almost rubbery in texture, but quite soft. The best substitute I have found is a loaf of French bread. Not as good as the real thing, but hey, beggars can't be choosers.

Toppings: All of this is personal choice. I like fried onions and mushrooms myself. Cheeses used vary - I hate to admit it but I think cheese whiz tastes the best. Provolone is awesome too and that's what I would use if I was afraid of the plastic orange stuff called whiz. Cooking the steak: In a cast iron frying pan, or a grill pan heat some oil. Saute toppings until pliable - make them however you like them. Remove them from pan and set aside. Pour some more oil in the pan (I use olive oil, but if you have access to the stuff they use in restaurants on grills it would taste even better) on medium high heat. Place 1/4 to 1/3 of a pound of meat in the pan, lying the pieces flat and overlapping to form a shape that will fit nicely in a bun. When the meat turns gray with doneness, flip it over and if you are using cheese slices now is the time to lie them on top of the meat. Add the other toppings back into the pan next to the meat and allow to reheat. Cover the pan to allow the cheese to melt. This should take 1-2 minutes. If the meat looks overcooked, that's OK - it should be GRAY.

This is the time to toast the bread if you so wish. I don't like mine toasted at all. Warmed is OK. If you are using cheese whiz, warm it in the microwave. Pick up meat and melted cheese with a spatula and deposit on the roll. IF using cheese whiz, use a butter knife or chopstick to smear whiz next to the meat.

Push the meat on one side of the roll and deposit the toppings next to it. This is important because if you put the toppings ON the meat, they will not be in the bottom of the sandwich, which really sux. You should get meat, toppings and cheese in every bite.

added by

speninv

nutrition

489 calories, 25 grams fat, 40 grams carbohydrates, 26 grams protein per serving.
Show full nutritional data (including Weight Watcher's Points ®, cholesterol, sodium, vitamins, and diabetic exchanges)

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comments & reviews



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Guest at CDKitchen.com




REVIEW: recipe rating
Served this to a bunch of teenage boys after a soccer game. Made them assembly line style. The boys are pretty spoiled now and will probably want them next week again. That's ok, I'm just glad they are eating homemade food and not fast food!


Registered Member at CDKitchen.com
Member since:
Feb 3, 2008





REVIEW: recipe rating
Used cheez whiz as that's how I remember these being made. Used minute steak instead of ribeye (too expensive). Good stuff.


Guest at CDKitchen.com




REVIEW: recipe rating
I've never had a real Philly cheesesteak so I have nothing to compare too (sheltered life, I know) but this was delicious!


Guest at CDKitchen.com




REVIEW: recipe rating
I'm from eastern PA and was raised in the Lehigh Valley and Philly area. This is how cheese steaks are made, In the LV usually w/ tomato sauce onion and American cheese or provolone w or w/o hot peppers, in PHILLY THAT A PIZZA STEAK. Usually without sauce and with onion and WHIZ(whiz with)Philly style cheese steak or with provolone and onions also, can add 'shrooms.


Guest at CDKitchen.com




REVIEW: recipe rating
The best substitute for the bread i've found is if you are lucky enough to have a jimmy johns in your area go buy a loaf from them it is relatively close in texture to the real thing


Guest at CDKitchen.com




REVIEW: recipe rating
I made this for me and my husband last year for the superbowl. He is a chef and he told me this was the best philly cheese steak he has ever had. I used a good french loaf and topped the rib eye with cheese whiz, mushrooms and onions. I can't wait to make it again this year!


Guest at CDKitchen.com

Andoy

COMMENT:
I was just in Philly and ate at two Cheeseteak emporiums-
You got to really keep chopping the meat into litle diced slivers with the side of a long sharp-sided spatula cintinously while cooking.
Onions & peppers cook with meat on grill, cheese goes on rolls.
End by placing opened roll, open side down, on top of cooking steak a few seconds -- then scoop the whole thing up with the long spatula, turn over and cut. Wow!


Guest at CDKitchen.com




REVIEW: recipe rating
A great reminder of details long lost over time. Thanks for enabling me to avoid the various efforts to imitate a delicious regional treat and duplicate the real thing myself.


Guest at CDKitchen.com

Guest Foodie

COMMENT:
Hey! something very similar to amoroso rolls can be found in a mexican panaderia. they're called bolillos (pronouncing the two 'l's as a y). you'd be surprised at just how similar they are!


Guest at CDKitchen.com




REVIEW: recipe rating
Pretty close to the real deal!